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Henry Jernegan’s Lottery Sale: one of only two known surviving copies of this sale catalogue. [Please read in conjunction with my essay: ‘Henry Jernegan, the Kandlers and the Client who changed his mind.’ If making use of this material, please acknowledge the source.]

A preliminary list of silver articles bearing the mark of John Jacob [Jean Jacob], London 1734-1768.

The First Castletops: a short examination of some Birmingham topographical souvenirs and their makers 1825-38.

‘The Partnership of Hukin and Heath’. The first version of an essay on the history of the firm of Hukin and Heath and the families who ran it. It will be revised and completed with an appendix list of patterns when it is possible once more to visit the relevant archives.

The Partnership of Hukin and Heath

My thanks, meanwhile, to those who have assisted me: Dorothy Prosser of the Totley History Group, Jonathan Nicholas, Deborah Roberts at the Goldsmiths’ Company, London, and Martin Levy of Blairman’s. I look forward to criticism, review, and fresh information.

The Letters of Richard Carter [awaiting editing and annotation].
Thomas Hammond, John Carter and Richard Carter: the Business of Silversmithing.
THE OPENING OF THE NEW GOLDSMITHS’ HALL IN LONDON

A leaflet on the opening of the new Goldsmiths’ Company Building in 1835 found inside George Lambert’s copy of ‘Memorials of the Goldsmiths’ Company’. The leaflet may have been preserved by Francis Lambert.

TWO CURIOUS GOTHIC LETTERS AND LOUIS HAMON, SILVERSMITH.

A short essay on a mark in the ‘Unregistered Marks’ section of ‘London Goldsmiths 1697 to 1837’ by Arthur Grimwade and the career of the silversmith Louis Hamon [Lewis Hamon]. This is a first draft and subject to further research….

FAMILY BUSINESS: ROBERT COLLIER, THE MASTER OF JAMES PHIPPS I, SILVERSMITH.

An examination of the links between the Collier and Phipps families of Witney and London. Now amended to include new information relating to Elizabeth Collier.

JOHN FOSSEY AND JOHN FESSEY: A CONFUSION RESOLVED.

A short essay on an eighteenth century London Goldsmith and a London engraver of the same period.

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